High Street Area D9

Area D9 Nos.46 – 40 High Street.











These four houses were all built on a piece of land which was originally a single property in 1690 when it was described as ‘a messuage and garden and orchard in Worthing on the east side of Worthing Street’(now High Street). The earliest house on this property later became No.40 High Street. Part of the garden to the north of this house was subdivided into two small plots of land which were sold off and by circa 1789 two additional houses had been erected facing Worthing Street and later became Nos. 44 & 42 High Street. However, the old orchard to the rear of the property was retained as part of the original property (No.40). A fourth house (No.46) was built around 1870 on the north part of the garden of No.44 and is shown on the 1875OS and later maps.

 

























Part of 1852OS map showing houses outlined in pink and the boundary of the original property in blue. The green outline defines the boundary of the original property after a piece adjacent to the street was subdivided into two small plots, sold off and two additional houses erected on them (Nos.44 & 42).  

In the 20th century Charlecote Road was formed between No.40 and the Fire Station (shown as Warwick Hall on the 1852 map) and the houses on the north side of Charlecote Road were built on the old orchard (see top Map). All four of these properties are still in use today (2012).































A photograph taken in February 1974 from the top of the multi-storey car-park

in High Street showing Nos.46 – 40 High Street (the four white buildings).








No.46 High Street.

This property is first shown on the 1875OS map and was built between 1866 and 1870 [It is not recorded in the 1866 Rate Book but is recorded with an occupant in the 1870 local Directory]. It was built on the garden of No.44 High Street and is still in use today (2012).






























No.46 High Street (in centre) from the south-west, February 1964.


























No.46 High Street (white building marked ‘ELLIS’).

Photo undated but probably late 1960s or early 1970s

Occupants list.

1870 – 1871 Mrs Watkins

1872            Mr Welsh

1873 – 1874 Capt Thomas

1875 – 1878 Listed as a ‘Furnished House’, no occupant(s) shown

1879 – 1887 G.Taylor – upholsterer

1888 – 1901 Edward Taylor – cabinet maker

1902 – 1906 Leonard Slade Howick – cabinet maker& house furnisher

1907 – 1912 Colin Moore – house furnisher

1913           ?

1914 – 1920 G.Field – Fields Store – furniture dealer

1914 – 1916 F.Brown

1921           Ernest B.Lee – house furnisher

1922 – 1939 Lee’s Store & Showrooms

1940 – 1975 R.H.EllisAuction Rooms & Office.



No.44 High Street.

This flint building was erected in circa 1789 and was owned by William Paine, blacksmith of Broadwater, in 1792. The building is still in use today (2012).

































No.44 High Street (black building in centre). Photograph taken in February 1981.

The building’s flint-work has been painted black.


Occupants list.

1824 – 1828 William Taylor – coachman

1838 – 1846 George A.Dusart – professor of music

1850 – 1887 George Taylor – cabinet maker (1861), upholsterer (from 1870)

1888 – 1901 Edward Taylor – cabinet maker

1902 – 1903 David Richie

1904 – 1905 Charles Reading – bootmaker

1906            Leonard Slade Howick – house furnisher

1907            F.Cowley

1908            G.Fortesquiu

1909 – 1916 Mrs C.Paine

1917 – 1919 Mrs Pemberton

1920 – 1932 Charles William Davey – bootmaker

1933 – 1934 ?

1935 – 1938 Miss E.Taylor

1939           ?

1940 – 1951 Francis H.Curtis

1953 – 1960 Mrs Curtis

1961 – 1975 R.H.Ellis Auction Rooms.


Nos. 42 & 40 High Street.





























Nos.42 (on left) & 40 High Street in February 1964.

No.42 High Street.

No.42 was built in circa 1789 and records show that it was owned in 1792 by William Paine, blacksmith of Broadwater, together with No.44. The building is still currently in use (2012).


Occupants list.

1821           Mrs Lambley

1824 – 1828 Richard Hide – miller

1841           Chris Hayward (?) – draper

1846 – 1862 James Hayward – carpenter

1866           William Patching

1870 – 1878 James Hayward

1879 – 1893 Mrs Hayward

1894           Empty

1895 – 1921 Miss A.Hayward

1922 – 1935 Miss J.Hayward

1936           ?

1937 – 1939 Charles Parker – surveyor

1937           F.Whittington

1938           A.Churcher & Sons

1939 – 1940 Albert dale

1940           Charles Forte – antique dealer

1941 – 1945 ?

1946           Walter Ware

1947 – 1948 ?

1949 – 1958 Ronald Maidment

1959 – 1961 ?

1962 – 1966 John K.Grainger

1967 – 1968 ?

1969           Kenneth Stubbs

1970 – 1975 Roberto Antiques

1970 – 1975 Moffat China & Glass Repairs.

 


No.40 High Street.

A building is recorded on this plot as early as January1690 when it was occupied by Thomas King, a brewer of Worthing, who was the eldest son of William and Mary King. This was probably the same Thomas King recorded as the occupant of ‘Sherwood’s Farm’ two years earlier in 1688 (see Area D8). The property was freehold and held of Broadwater manor and various owners can be traced back to the early part of the 18th century, most of who appear to have let their property to local inhabitants. In 1702 it was occupied by Daniel Avery and in 1731 by George Lingoe. According to the Land Tax lists Christopher Corfe, yeoman of Worthing, had acquired the property by at least 1780 and he was both owner and occupant. After his death his widow continued to occupy the premises and by 1808 James Corfe (eldest son and heir of Christopher), a baker, was recorded in the property. Later Mr Piggott, also a baker and confectioner, occupied the building. Currently the building is in use and has bow windows on the top floor and is undoubtedly old. It appears quite probable that the original house was modified and extended during the Georgian period, possibly in circa 1789 when the adjoining building to the north (No.42) was erected. However, as yet this can not be verified, but this building must rate as one of the oldest surviving buildings in Worthing.



























A photograph taken in February 1981 showing No.40 High Street (in centre) as

the ‘Toby Jug Restaurant’. On the right of the building can be seen Charlecote

Road with its houses built on the old orchard which was once part of No.40.  



Occupants list.

1690           Thomas King – brewer

1702           Daniel Avery

1731           George Lingoe

1780 -  ?      Christopher Corfe – yeoman

?                 Mrs Corfe

1808 -  ?      James Corfe - baker

1818 – 1822 George Piggott – baker & confectioner

1838           Robert Anderson

1846           ------  Williams

1850 – 1851 George Newland

1861 – 1862 Robert Moore – independent

1866 – 1870 William Patching

1871 – 1887 Robert Newland

1888           Empty

1889 – 1894 Miss F.Stuart

1895           Empty

1896 – 1898 Mr J.Goatcher

1899           Empty

1900 – 1913 Frederick Henry Baker – pork butcher

1914           Empty

1915 – 1916 H.V.Sheldrake – confectioner

1917           Mrs E.Wentworth – confectioner

1918 – 1921 Charles Courtnadge – confectioner

1923 – 1926 Frank Mitchell – tobacconist

1925           J.G.Groom

1925 – 1928 H.Jennings

1927 – 1929 Trask Brothers – confectioners

1929           King of the Road Motors

1930 – 1931 Mrs E.M.Tighe – tobacconist

1932 – 1933 Mrs Ann Jones – tobacconist

1934           W.Simmonds – confectioner

1938 – 1940 Mrs E.Standing – tobacconist

1941 – 1945 ?

1946           NFS Officers Mess

1947 – 1950 ?

1951           John William Hicks MBE

1951           R.J.Simmons & Co Auction Rooms

1953 – 1956 Mrs Minto

1953            Christophers Antiques

1956 – 1958  H.Burtenshaw - Ann Boleyn Antiques

1960 – 1975 Toby Jug Tea Rooms – [later shown as ‘Toby Jug Restaurant’].


AC

www.westsussexpast.org.uk - P005440

RK

AC

www.westsussexpast.org.uk

AC